Category: Law and Government

Tenants Suffer Yet Another Loss at the Georgia Court of Appeals

The Georgia Court of Appeals recently ruled that landlords can severely limit legal actions against them by tenants. Even if you’re not a tenant, the decision is important because it’s another example of how consumers are routinely forced to forgo their access to the judicial system in order to participate in everyday transactions. Tenants did, though, score a major victory in the Georgia Legislature.

The Burden on Landlords to Protect Tenants Has Been Diminished

Georgia law has long allowed juries to find a landlord liable if they fail to take necessary steps to keep a tenant safe. It’s a basic legal protection given to tenants, particularly those in higher-crime areas. The Georgia Court of Appeals, though, is okay scrapping the whole jury thing if the judge thinks the tenant should have known not to get harmed. So no more juries, even if the landlord’s botched security job may have contributed to the tenant’s harm.

Weekly Links: The EPA Loves the NHL, Snow Leads to Better Urban Design, and Atlanta’s World-Class Traffic

Snow in Vine City

A weekly roundup of interesting stories from around the country. The National Hockey League is not just one of the biggest buyers of green energy among sports leagues, but among all US companies. Philadelphia created better designed streets simply by looking at where cars drive in the snow. And a stress-relieving simulation of traffic moving through various types of intersections.

Is the Supreme Court Capable of Valuing the Environment?

The Supreme Court issue an opinion in the Water Wars case between Georgia and Florida as early as May 21st. When the two states made their arguments in January, several justices appeared sympathetic to Florida. Meanwhile, in a brief on the matter, Atlanta asserted that the Supreme Court shouldn’t even attempt to help Florida because the benefits of the environment are often too vague to be valued.

Citing the Need for More Coffee Shops, Cities Back Plan to Seize Private Property

Cities are in love with small coffee shops, artisan burger shops, and boutique clothing stores. The only thing they like more is taking people’s property and converting it to those types of businesses. This is, of course, a bit of hyperbole, though many would make that statement with much more sincerity. A bill passed by the Georgia Legislature would allow local governments to condemn blighted property and sell it to developers. It’s not a bad idea.